TASTEFUL RUDE

…a magazine that is typically tasteful. And a little bit rude.

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About Tasteful Rude

Tasteful Rude’s editorial voice eschews politeness in favor of truth-seeking and fun. It is Tasteful Rude’s mission to abide by Edward’s Said’s commandment: "Criticism must think of itself as life-enhancing and constitutively opposed to every form of tyranny, domination, and abuse."

‘Executive Order’ Re-Writes the Post-Apocalyptic Genre

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Executive Order challenges viewers to re-think the post-apocalyptic format and hero-making narratives, flipping the script on a genre that has long reinforced racism, centering Black humanity as a racist government lead by an evil Karen tries to force all Black people to repatriate to Africa as a form of reparations.

Executive Order Film Still
On June 17, 2021

Bankrupt: An Excerpt From Driven: A Kunstlerroman

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In this excerpt from Chris Rice’s hardboiled memoir, an artist dumps her boozehound bankrupt boyfriend, steals what is rightfully hers, herself, and retreats to Venice, California

Hand, cigarette, & empty beer glass
On June 15, 2021

I Know You Want It

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I was embarrassed to admit I'd been sexually assaulted. It hadn’t really been anything, but it had been giving me nightmares, his lips forming the words, “Your mouth is saying no, but your body is saying yes.” I was someone who was very comfortable, very open, about her sexuality and having sex. Why would the way he acted make my skin crawl for so long after he did it?

Blurred Lines video still
On June 11, 2021

Bargain Basement Queerness

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What is gayness if it isn’t visible via purchases? What is safety if it isn’t sanctioned by the consumer state? Without Target gay gear, many celebrants would be left indistinguishable from the average heterosexual white dude.

Pride Family
On June 8, 2021

Pocas Pero Locas, Episode 3: “Wassup, M’ija?”

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After a gang unit stopped my 14 year old cousin for driving in a stolen hoopty, they took her to Eastlake Juvenile Hall and handed her over to a new abuser: a cop.

Desiree Gurba
On June 1, 2021

Pocas Pero Locas, Episode 2: Chicken Soup for the Homies’ Soul

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An older homegirl, a hood mom whom Desiree considered her mentor, announced, "I'm jumping you in."

Desiree Gurba
On May 27, 2021

The Girl and the Nappy Halo

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As I settle into my pregnancy, I fantasize about the human I’m going to bring into the world. I picture a girl. Beautiful. Black. Freckled like her father. Myopic like me. When she is thirteen we will sit down and have the talk. Not about periods. Or boys. Or girls. Or bodies. Or pets. Or HBCUs. Or sex. But about getting a perm.

Little girl with nappy hair
On May 21, 2021

Pocas Pero Locas: An Interpersonal Chicana Essay Where Two Primas Make Sure Shit Gets Told Right

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Myriam Gurba writes about her cousin Desiree, female gangsters, cholas, Mexican bad asses with big hair, and the criminalization of survivors.

Myriam and Desiree Gurba, 1988
On May 18, 2021

For Better or Worse

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When my uncle Claude eventually passes away, he'll leave behind an estate of remarkable wealth. He's the only one of my father's siblings that was able to retire before becoming eligible for AARP citizenship. It's remarkable for me to think that for most of my life I've known my uncle as a shady real estate investor rather than the cheerful supervisor at the Palo Alto Main Post Office.

wedding in oakland
On May 13, 2021

Embodied is an Intertextual and Intersectional Masterpiece

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I could go on and on about these collaborations, but I don’t have enough space here to describe how wonderfully, gloriously, and lovingly enthralling they are. There are poems about birth and the body, stories of misogyny at a university and of grappling with a miscarriage. These works explore heritage, family, gender, love, and in the case of the inimitable Diane Seuss, tits. Altogether, they typify the robust state of contemporary poetry.

Embodied Cover
On May 6, 2021

But You Don’t Look Asian: On Being Entitled to Pain

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Who deserves to feel the pain of anti-Asian violence? Who deserves to take up space with their rage? As a mixed-race person, am I allowed to be here? Do I belong?

Asian protester in NYC
On May 4, 2021

My Life at the Dildo Factory

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A story of workplace abuse: “Saftey words are for Pussies!” read the misspelled Roy-Lichtenstein-does-BDSM faux pop art painting displayed in the office of the Anonymous Sex Toy Company. "Safe, Sane, and Consensual" was the company motto. None of the men running the company understood those slogans were incompatible.

Saftey Words Are For Pussies!
On April 29, 2021

Her Taste For Speed: Rachel Kushner’s “The Hard Crowd”

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The Hard Crowd offers us a portrait of Kushner through her preoccupations, obsessions, concerns, affinities, and distastes. Her writing on others is always writing about the self and in this sense, she is always doing donuts, flashing the lens externally so as to make an entire revolution, pointing the eye inward once again.

Myriam with the Hard Crowd
On April 28, 2021

Crying in H-Mart: Grief, Hunger, and Healing

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In rock musician Michelle Zauner's memoir "Crying in H-Mart", food is not just a vessel to memorialize her mother but a touchstone for accessing her Korean heritage.

Crying in H-Mart book cover
On April 22, 2021

A Good Top is Hard to Find: Revisiting the S&M Classic Leash 20 Years Later

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In Leash transgressive sex functions less as a subject, or site of guaranteed liberation, and more as a framework to explore how power moves through us, trapping us even as it promises to liberate us. In the age of pink-washed internet activism, DeLynn’s writing is a prescient reminder that any radical transformation of our sex lives, much less society, will never be painless.

Leash book cover
On April 20, 2021

The Cold, Hard Truths About Texas

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The blackout has left me with time to reflect on my Texas childhood. A daughter of immigrants, white-washed and shamed for my brownness and non-compliance to the Texas Way, this blackout has ignited an anger I've felt for most of my life. The failure of Texas goes beyond wifi. It is a failure of ethos.

texas winter storm
On April 15, 2021

Is Lil Nas X The Spiritual Heir of Little Richard?

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If we stop to examine our family tree, it becomes obvious that Lil Nas X is the fulfillment of Little Richard’s dreams. In a world where neoliberal gayness has taught us that the best we can hope for is Lady Gaga belting out the national anthem while deportations mount, Lil Nas X charitably tossed us a Zyrtec.

Lil Nas X
On April 13, 2021

Some Workplace Injuries are No Accident

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In the past five months, incidents of women getting threatened, hurt, or killed at their American workplaces appeared on national news. On November 12, the NY Post outed a paramedic as a sex worker, resulting in a barrage of threats. The exposure also jeopardized her job. On January 6, we saw Congresswomen hide in their offices in lockdown while gallows were being erected for them outside their work building. On March 16, we learned that six women in Atlanta were killed when a mass shooter came into their place of work. It’s clear from these incidents that the prestige, location, or salary of a woman’s job has no bearing on how safe she is at work. When society normalizes gender-based violence in the home, it also normalizes gender-based violence in the workplace.

Ambulance in New York
On April 8, 2021

Matt Gaetz: an Extraordinarily Ordinary Creep

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What makes the accusations against Matt Gaetz so plausible is the ubiquity of men like him. Many of them work for state, like my former coworker John William Gunde, a high school teacher arrested for sex with a minor, currently on paid administrative leave.

Matt Gaetz
On April 6, 2021

In Which a Black Pedestrian Redefines Violence

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A young Black person is ticketed and almost arrested for jaywalking by a maskless cop who believes his helmet will protect him from covid-19. Meanwhile down the street, a white woman operates a dine-in restaurant against the law, with 22 citations from the city and gas bootlegged from a neighboring apartment building. Jasmin Roberts explores the highly uneven and racialized application of the law in Long Beach.

woman jaywalking
On April 1, 2021